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Topic: Nigeria is a country with so much. Why does it have all these problems? - ENTER BIAFRA FREEDOM AWARENESS CHANNEL

Home Forums Biafra Freedom Forum Nigeria is a country with so much. Why does it have all these problems?

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    • #2611
      Simon Ekpa
      Keymaster

      [caption id="attachment_3360" align="alignleft" width="439"] People gather during a protest against the scrapping of oil subsidy at Gani Fawehinmi Park, Ojota in Lagos on January 12, 2012. Nigerian oil workers vowed Thursday to begin shutting down production of Africa’s top crude exporter, piling intense pressure on the government ahead of talks on the fourth day of a nationwide strike. AFP PHOTO / PIUS UTOMI EKPEI (Photo credit should read PIUS UTOMI EKPEI/AFP/Getty Images)[/caption]

      Scholars and analysts have long debated the question of why Nigeria, with all it’s human and resource wealth, remains so troubled by poverty, violence, and instability. While people can and do disagree, they tend to settle on a few root causes, which all build on one another:

      • British colonialism, which left the country weakened by a century of exploitation and manipulation, and which forced disparate ethnic and religious groups into an artificial state, set Nigeria up for decades of conflict for control over natural resources and over the government.
      • A curse of oil wealth worsens those conflicts as well as the already-dire government corruption, feeding popular resentment against the state and at times against Nigerians from the other side of religious or ethnic divides who are perceived to receive more of the fruits of the oil wealth.
      • A global rise in religious extremism exacerbates Christian-Muslim tension and has introduced al-Qaeda-style violent extremism to the mostly-Muslim north.
      • An ongoing economic malaise, made worse by the oil curse, leaves the lower classes in poverty and the educated middle-classes under-employed. While overall economic growth is high, most Nigerians have not benefitted.

      Journalist Karl Maier’s 2001 book-length attempt to answer this question, This House Has Fallen: Nigeria in Crisis, remains a depressingly relevant diagnosis today. It begins with the epigraph, “Nigeria is like being on an airplane that has just been taken over by hijackers. You do not want to compromise with the gunmen, but the prime concern is to land the plane, so there is no choice but to give in.” The book warned, as many have warned before and since, that Nigeria could be on the verge of collapse. Journalist and Nigeria scholar G. Pascal Zachary wrote of Maier’s thesis in 2012, when the country was also in crisis, “Now, 12 years later, Nigeria’s condition looks unchanged or worse.”

      Still, don’t make the mistake of categorizing Nigeria as a failed state or as the kind of place where suffering is the norm. For one thing, its citizens are highly engaged in trying to solve what problems exist: mass “Occupy Nigeria” demonstrations in 2012 used outrage over reduced gas subsidies to protest inequality and government corruption. And Nigeria is in many ways the leading edge of Africa’s economic and political rise. Still, that makes the recent violence all the more painful. As Nigerian-American novelist Teju Cole tweeted on May 2, the day a Boko Haram car bomb killed 19 people in the capital of Abuja:

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    • #2601
      Simon Ekpa
      Keymaster

      Nigeria is a country with so much. Why does it have all these problems?

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      • This reply was modified 5 years, 1 month ago by Simon Ekpa.
      • This reply was modified 10 months, 1 week ago by Anthony-Claret.
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